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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
we're really engaging diplomatically with china and other members of united nations security council on tougher resolutions and possibly sanctions. >> making any progress? >> you have to talk to the ambassadors in new york and the sea to figure out what is going on. -- d.c. to figure out what is going on. >> in beijing, what is the view among the leaders you can tell of kim jong-u7n? -- kim jong-un? >> china would like all the parties that are part of this sixth party talks her to get back to the table, to see if we can encourage better behavior from north korea as opposed to imposing sanctions now and trying to coerce north korea into the fold. that is a difference of opinion of strategy. china really believes we ought to be engaged with north korea. united states feels every time we've tried to engage with north korea, they basically turnaround and failed to respond. >> what is the most important thing the chinese leaders want from you every day? >> the want greater cooperation with united states, because the understand how important united states is for their own economy.
think the world will look like. it's fascinating. it shows china on the rise, the west in decline and china overtaking the united states in size of economy by the year 2030. here are the key findings of the new intel report. it's interesting reading. a majority of the world's population by 2030 will be out of poverty for the first time in world history. there will be wars over food and water and natural resores. populations will continue to rise and there will be recurring global economic crises but when you think about this, you think about how far we're going here. you've got asia, china in particular will be dominant. it will be stronger than its been anytime since middleages. there will be no more pax americana as its known. china will be a big driver and india will be growing like china is today. they talk about how the world is changing. it's like no other time since the french revolution. remember in the late 18th century, the industrial revolution, except it's happening more quickly. it's taking a tenth of the time for china and asia to rise quickly. let me read to you som
. mandela was moved to his home in johannesburg where he will continue his recovery. >>> china opened the world's longest high-speed rail line today. the train travels more than 1,400 miles from beijing in the north to the south of china, a trip that until now took 20 hours. the new train traveling at 186 miles per hour cuts the time to just eight hours. hundreds of the new trains will be put into service on this line alone, as china moves toward its goal of building a nationwide high-speed rail network. >>> and back in this country, a lost and found story involving a best friend. it all began christmas eve outside a grocery store here in new york where a security camera shows a man stealing a dog and then walking away. that dog's name is marlee. a woman who saw him trying to sell the dog thought something was up, so she bought marlee herself, took him to a vet and it turns out he had a microchip which was scanned. as a result, the king charles spaniel was reunited with his 7-year-old owner yesterday afternoon. perhaps the best christmas present she could have wished for. a suspect wa
markets around the world were closed for christmas, and for the day after christm christmas. china, five-month high on the notion that the urbanization plan will gain spurs in the housing stocks there. japan, abe confirmed as prime minister there. the seventh prime minister in the past six years. we did see the yen hit a 20-month low against the u.s. dollar. notable lows against the euro as well. the topics in the nikkai the lowest in nine months. >> going back to his old job, that he had back in 2007. strange in and of itself. i wonder how long it will take for people to start talking about netflix after the outage going into christmas eve on social media. they were calling it no flix. and to blame amazon web services, which is one of their huge growth engines. a unit of the company they say is probably a tenth of its eventual size. >> one of the highest growth parts of amazon right now, the web services portion. their amazon is down 1.25%. i don't know if that's the reason. but it was the streaming center in northern virginia that was the source of the netflix outage. it's resolved, th
. export orders, a sign of weakness there and in china and in some of the pmi figures that we got across europe. so the theme that is emerging, while germany even showed some signs perhaps of strength in its service sector, there's still concern about global growth prospects. for that reason, all the more reason why perhaps it's important for policymakers to be proactive, including mario draghi. back over to you guys. >> thank you for that. who is going to be the squawk perpendicular of the year, joe? >> you mean if we pick one? >> if we pick one. >> we have to pick one that's not obvious. >> like mcafee, maybe. i had an opportunity to pick business person of the year and i picked richard scrusi. it's so hard to find an honest cfo. remember the guy that helped out? i think he was on his way up the river or something. you have to pick it so there's an edge to it. >> like leo apatae or something like that. >> no, like mcafee. i didn't mention that, but he may get the squawk person of the year award today. it depends on how he answers your probing -- your father was a litigator, right? >> t
system -- the reaction to china they just have a police chief said the prosecutor and the justice they get together and what kind of system is that? where does the defense have these rights? that's right, and then i think, you know, 98% or 95% of the cases are decided by a plea-bargain between the prosecutor and the lead defense lawyer. and i say what kind of a system is that? .. >> go into a courtroom. it's a nasty system. and it isn't terribly efficient. they put it in because hamilton and the others hoped it would do one kind of a guarantee of a certain kind of basic liberty. and, of course, i believed in that. i wouldn't spend so much time -- yes. now, here. sorry. >> thanks. justice breyer, and john. i write the mitchell report. as i was listening to the beginning of this conversation between the two of you i was reminded of a wonderful conversation that took place probably 30 plus years ago between bill moyers and one of, a former justice, justice blackmun, talking about the constitution. answer this question sort of goes to at what's at the heart of constitutionalism and ru
a satellite into orbit. its neighbors are unnerved. even china expressed regret at the move. the obama administration condemned it as a provocative act and will likely ask the u.n. security council to impose crippling sanctions. the pentagon following developments this morning. chris lawrence there. what do you know, chris? >> right now, officials say that object that north korea put into orbit, monitoring it, analyzing it, but they confirm it is in orbit. why is that important? the same technology you would use to put into orbit is the same technology you use to develop long-range ballistic missiles, the u.s. condemned this act. they are worried about the marriage of north korea's nuclear weapons with this long-range missile technology. this is the type of missile that if it was successful, as it appears to be, could reach parts of the united states, alaska, u.s. military bases in hawaii. but a u.s. efficiently i spoke with who used to work on north north korea for the defense department told me, there are still areas in which north korea has not made it as far as they would need to i
rate in china, and in a few years it will surpass the u.s. what it means, coming up. >>> dozens of homes damaged in the south, ripping off roofs and damaging trees. more to come. stamp watch, straight ahead. >>> lots to talk about this morning. the next two hours, we'll talk with steve israel. jeff sessions, sandy levin, rahm emanuel and businessman javier paolomarez, ed burns, frankie monday easy, and chuck leavell. "starting point" begins right now. welcome, everybody. "starting point" this morning, angry, united. bracing for protests in michigan as the state is poised to become the most unionized right to work state. as many as 10,000 unionized workers expected at the state capitol to voice their disapproval of the measure. some of them teachers, two detroit area school districts shut down for the day as hundreds of teachers plan to join the protest. president obama brought it up during a trip to a daimler truck factory in redford, michigan. this is what he said. >> this so-called right to work law, they don't have to do with economics, everything to do with politics. what th
specially trained to detect suspicious behavior. >>> in china, the longest high-speed rail is off and running thanks to speeds 146 miles an hour. the train will take about eight hours instead of 20. >>> all right, coming up. find out how some folks show the spirit of the season by spending their christmas day lending a hand to those who need it most this year. you're watching "early today." >>> and welcome back to "early today." christmas should be a day of joy and celebration, but in many parts of the country, recent tragic events gave this year's holiday a different feeling. here's nbc's john yang. [ bells toll ] >> reporter: in newtown, connecticut, it was a day of lingering heartache. empty stockings now filled with gift. first responders gave their time so the town's police could spend the day with their family. >> just the right thing to do. that's why we're here. something needs to be done and we're glad to be here. >> it's a pleasure helping out. >> police officers giving police officers time off, you couldn't ask for a better christmas gift. >> reporter: in the new york a
would be short yen and long japanese stocks. >> people watching not just january but china. ir ir ir iron oar a lot. >> let's get more insight from steve from web bush securities. how much of a nail biter is this for you in terms of fiscal cliff and the markets? >> i think pretty clear at this point that if there's a deal coming, it's gonna be coming very, very soon. i think the markets discounted the fact we are going to get some sort of deal t has held up fairly well here and i think if we don't get a deal, we will see a selloff. i don't know how considerable, but certainly see the 2, 3% decline in the market. >> does it amaze you, steve, that the markets, in your view, still consider a given that we are going to reach a deal? here we are thursday, december 27th. they still haven't issued a 48-hur notice for congress to return to capitol hill and yet you're saying the markets have baked in some sort of deal? >> yeah, i think so. i don't in he isly think the deal happened december 31st. if we pass waite without a deal earthquake the market will think something is going to happen in
's longest high speed rail line is up and running and it's in, where else, china. the 1428 mile line spans more than half the country linking the capital of beijing to the southern chinese bloom city. trains will run at 186 miles per hour. >>> and civil rights icon nelson mandela has been discharged from a south africa hospital. 94-year-old former president will continue treatment at his home. he was hospitalized with a lung infection on december 8th. one week later, he had surgery to remove gallstones. i'm sure everyone's pleased to hear that he's doing well. >> thanks so much for that, lisa. >>> in the wake of the connecticut school shooting, the nr after the wants to put armed volunteers in every american school. the proposal facing heavy criticism. the man in charge is here to defend it. plus how the host of nbc's "meet the press" may have broken washington, d.c. gun laws. it's lots of things. all waking up. ♪ becoming part of the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ trees will talk to networks will talk to scientists about climate change. cars will talk to road
. >>> in china the longest high speed railway opens, connects beijing with guangzhou, 1,500 in eight hours, but tickets start at $138, and they're a little pricey for some people and many travelers say it's cheaper and faster to fly. >>> a report just out this morning shows home prices up in october, the biggest annual gain in more than two years. alison kosik joins us from the new york stock exchange. tell us more. >> this is a bigger gain than analysts were expecting. home prices in 20 of the biggest cities in the u.s. went up by 4.3% in october compared to october of last year and as you said it is the biggest increase in more than two years. prices also they've gone up for five months in a row so that's more good news as well as far as the momentum goes. this jives with a lot of the other housing reports that have come in on the positive side talking about home sales, home building, builder confidence, all of those are showing this upward momentum, so yeah, housing is definitely in recovery mode, and it's really helping to boost the entire economy. in fact we saw that with third quarte
at an air base. >> china has the fastest train in the world, it will travel nearly 200 miles per hour. >> he was stolen from a street in new york city and now thanks to good samaritans the dog is back home. >> whoa! >>> there goes santa! look at that. >> this sad, an alabama fan, a hat, and tickets to the bcs title game. >> we're going to the game! ♪ >>> welcome to cbs this morning. we begin with this powerful storm system that caused a string of tornadoes that damaged buildings and knocked out hour in places like louisiana, mississippi, and alabama. it dropped heavy snow in parts of texas, oklahoma, and arkansas. >> it's blamed for three deaths and we'll check the forecast but we begin in hard hit mobile alabama where blake brown of our cbs affiliate is watching the tornado damage blake, good morning. >>> good morning this is the scene here in mobile, we have big trees down powerlines down, roof damage and it is just hours after the storm ripped through the city. >> volatile conditions as tornadoes toucheddown around mobile. >> i was screams and hollaring, and i
can see, with the kospi up the most, 1.5 points. >> strong nebs out of china which suggest maybe the economy is rebounding more than expected. >> the exports. >> yeah. >> among the catalyst in asia trading today, economic stats out of china. export growths slowed sharply to 2.9% in december. that news j underscores the global headwinds dragging on the economy. but the chinese economy is showing solid signs of a pick up in domestic activity. industrial output was stronger than expected. the country has been saying for years it needs to shift a little bit from the export model the internal consumption. let their middle class grow and not be nearly as dependent on exports. and china's oil demand in november surpassed 10 million barrels per day for the first time ever. the country's crude imports rose to the second highest daily rate on record. analysts say this is further evidence of the chinese recover. and i saw this story on -- every once in a while i check tweeting. >> i saw it on google, too. kayla tausche reporting -- >> kayla beat nick dunn. >> nick dunn was quoting kayla. >>
to america at 14, 15, $16 an hour. we don't celebrate that. i'm glad they're here instead of china, but heck. if we had an economy that would support $30-an-hour jobs, i'd be for that. better than a ceo. you know, destroying a company and then getting a $200 million payout. but that said, what is wrong with a state allowing an american to work where he or she wants to work without having to be compelled to pay union dues? >> well, this state, michigan, was such a part of the core of unionism in this country, the foundation of the united automobile workers which at one point had over 1 million workers in its enrollment is now down to roughly maybe 350,000 workers. the united automobile workers, everybody can own a car in america. the history of unionism has been inextricably linked to the growth of the middle class, as you know, over the last 60 years of american history. the right-to-work legislation that has passed now in 24 states, i don't think you can dem demonstrably prove that it leads to higher wages, that it leads to marginally -- >> but what's wrong with giving people the freedom to
to taiwan and china in october and the buzz around windows 8 fell off a cliff from the june time period. so there's a lot of enthusiasm in june at the show in taipei. and by october, there was no enthusiasm. so i think a lot of the momentum had been lost and a lot of companies told me, look, it's really a second half of 2013 story. >> so what does that mean, not only for microsoft were but for the hardwaremaker? are being buying products from dell and the like and buying the windows 7 version or are they turning to google and mac? what's happening? >> more and more consumers are turning to smartphones and tablet devices and i think a lot of the hardware vendors are saying, you know what? when we do a refresh, let's wait until a year out, second half of 2013. it's probably not worth the investment today, especially with a lot of aggressive tablets coming out, including the ipad mini. so, you know, that -- i think they were planning on doing a more aggressive ramp, probably around ultra book with windows 8. and then they decided to delay it until next year. >> look out a little bit into 2013
of lives, syria's only friends in the world have been naturally iran and china but also their best friends, russia. russia. and that was true until today. russia today did not formally declare that they're no longer going to support the syrian government against the rebels, but for the first time a high-ranking russian official said publicly that yeah, it looks like assad is going to lose this war. i mean, the united states has been saying that forever. nato has been saying that forever. everybody who wants assad to go has been saying that forever. you try to create an air of inevitability about the thing you want to happen. right? that makes sense. but now for the other side to be saying it, for syria's best friend to be saying yeah, syria, you're going to lose this, it's going to happen, that is a huge, huge deal. it is sometimes hard to follow the day-to-day news out of this war, to know what is an important day and what is just another awful day. but this is a really important moment. because syria was sort of down to their last friend in the world. and if they are now down to not even
invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se must have been a dozen of us -- got together with the leaders of china. we were accorded every courtesy we could possibly be accorded because of the presence of senator inouye and senator stevens. they were like brothers. they called one another "brothers." they acted that way in private. they served that way in the senate as chairman and vice-chairman and vice-chairman and chairman of the appropriations committee. they single-handedly shaped our american defense posture and they did it with skill and pay troivmen--and patriotism and the that very few could have. several senators have mentioned how bipartisan dan inouye was. he was of the old school. not a bad school for today, in my point of view. he treated each senator with
this that a very similar incident happened in china. a man in an elementary school with a knife, not an assault weapon, almost two dozen kids injured but not killed. >> in 1996 a man went into a gym class in scotland, killed 16 5-year-olds and 6-year-olds and the teacher. a few years ago in norway, a young, deranged, young man killed, what, 69 people on an island, mostly teenagers. connecticut has among the toughest gun laws in this country. didn't help. scotland and norway have very tough gun laws, didn't help. >> didn't stop but it does lessen the occasion of violence, doesn't it? >> since columbine there have been 181 of these school shootings. >> remember, we did have a ban on assault weapons. when we put the ban in place these incidents didn't decline in a measurable way. and when we took them off they didn't increase in a measurable way. >> there were five guns in the house. the shooter chose two semiautomatic pistols and one semiautomatic rifle. he did not choose the two deer hunting rifles. it seems to me that the congresswoman is absolutely right, there is a bright line here that we sh
making $1 in mexico in factories. later burma and later china. so suddenly they have a narrative saying mooirn autoworkers make more money than people in mexico and china. those workers have no rights. ordinary citizens in those countries have no rights to change their traditions and now we have ap narrative saying american autoworkers make too mitch but they don't. and point two was to undo labor law. regan came in 1981 and regan, as we famously know. >> let me stop you there on that nearive. undoing the labor lay starts much earlier. >> absolutely. >> i'm just trying to -- >> i know, but the 47 is when it really starts. to say what happens in '47. in some ways '47 -- the opening thing in this batting is really '47. >> i'll start at 35. no one understands how this works. >> hear that america. none of you understand this. >> gun safety and restoring american workers from a middle class standard it's all on a continuum. 1935, the national relation's act is passed. the mlra. by 1947, the taft hartley act is passed and that begins a systematic rollback of labor law in this country but it t
of obesity compared to children born vaginally. researchers in china looked at previous studies on obesity and thousands of births and say that health risks must be taken seriously. previous studies linked c-section births to allergies and diabetes later in life. we found one guy on our staff delivered c-section and is one of the fittest guys on our staff. >> he weighed ten pounds at the time. big baby. >> he's buff. not overweight. >>> in other news, marriage is good for people. gay and straight in fact. that's the finding of a new study. it shows same-sex couples married enjoy the same psychological benefits as heterosexual couples. more from abc senior medical contributor. >> reporter: as same-sex couples wait to hear what the supreme court says about their marrying, a study in the american journal of public health has already offered an opinion. the study looked at data from the 2009 california health interview survey, which included 47,000 participants, both men and women, ages 18 to 70, and both homosexuals and heterosexuals. the authors say married gay, lesbian and bisexual people h
sachs to buy from neutral. citing increased potential for yum's operations in china. although, that's what we talk about all the time. kfc in china. that's the growth in their, i think isn't yum bigger than mcdonald's in terms of total number? >> yeah. >> i think subway is, too. research -- >> they don't even call it kentucky tried anymore. >> kfc. >> and it's really chicken. >> that's uncalled for. what do you think it is, cat? that is uncalled for. >> this is all i'll say. >> tastes like chicken. >> yes, it's chicken! if david novak -- >> taco bell. >> yeah, taco bell. >> is that really meat? is that your next -- >> no. all right. the restaurant -- research in motion, rim shares coming off a seven-month high on news that the u.s. immigrations and customs enforcement agent are going to use the blackberry 10 on a trial basis. that is on news, did you see this, that the agency is going to ditch the iphone in favor -- >> okay, so why? >> i don't know. i just want to say, so blackberry was one of the sponsors of the thing yesterday, at the dealbook conference and they showed off the bl
for antibiotics and steroids. some major issues for yum brands, 44% of its revenues come from china. getting the clearance at this point, very good news, and we're seeing the stock respond accordingly. bob pisani is here on the floor with more. >> good morning. merry christmas, everybody. over the weekend, is there a plan c on the fiscal cliff floating around. the only offer that's really on the table, and i hate to get so simplist simplistic, was the president's offer. he mentioned it at the press conference late friday afternoon, and that's raise taxes on the top 2%. that's basically the offer on the table. there's a lot of people trying to throw in a lot of spending cuts into a so-called plan c, raise the medicare eligibility age from 65 to 67. that's really an afterthought going in right now. the president's offer is the one on the table right now. at this point the choices are getting very, very narrow. i didn't hear do nothing. i didn't hear about a grand bargain. the other big thing over the weekend, i was getting a lot of e-mail about, is when will the treasury department declare the
into intensifying nationalism. there could be military clashes any day between china and japan of violence. the whole region is becoming more tense. after we leave afghanistan, i think the problems in the region will slide northward to central asia. that will involve in different ways china, russia and india. we have a crisis on our hands in syria. we have pressures to go to war against iran. these are the kind of issues that really need attentive leadership from the secretary of state that is intensely interested in them and has the kind of experience and global background that is needed for that kind of job. >> i just want to add to the list the recent north korea missile test, rocket test, aka, a missile test, and the close collaboration between north korea and iran. iran is pretty advanced on miniaturizing nuclear warheads. and north korea is very advanced on missiles. and if that collaboration continues, we may have a very serious confrontation. >> and so there's no island of stability out there in this from north korea all the way into africa. and a lot of the intel people say that t
on january 4th. they fear this could be to natural gas production what the "china syndrome" was to the nuclear power industry. it stars matt damon looking to line up leases in pennsylvania farm country and john as a environmental activist to try to stop him. >> i'm here my farm is gone. the land turned brown. it happened to one of us. it could happen to all of us. >> reporter: damon and chris since ski who co-wrote the script together, they're using fracking as jumping off point to explore american identity. >> it really asks more questions than it answers but they're important questions that i think we're all need to be asking right now. >> reporter: but conservative blogs like the heritage foundation say this move -- movie looks nothing on surface to be hit piece on tracking indisstri. analysts say this could be a big problem going forward. charles edwards with the brookings institution. >> someone like matt damon will make convincing actor, undoubtedly casting concerns about shale gas on the horizon. that will probably become a lot of people's perceptions that shale gas
.s. economy will go into recession. we closed down our manufacturing in china and relocated it in the usa. for other companies to follow our lead, they need to trust our leaders in washington will actually lead. think outside the box, great incentive for businesses to invest in the u.s. economy. we believe the more you know, the better you trade. so we have ongoing webinars and interactive learning, plus, in-branch seminars at over 500 locations, where our dedicated support teams help you know more so your money can do more. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our teams have the information you want when you need it. it's another reason more investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. what starts with adding a friend... ♪ ...could end with adding a close friend. the lexus december to remember sales event is on. this is the pursuit of perfection. >>> financials have been on fire for most of 2012. but interest rates and regulation are still putting some profit margins under pressu pressure. here's what's in store for 2013. >> reporter: after a year's l
to evacuate u.s. military personnel. >>> now to a terrifying scene for shoppers in china. if you are afraid of sharks, you may not want to watch this video. this was an indoor tsunami. a huge shark tank burst, sending broken glass and water crashing into onlookers. more than a dozen people were injured. mostly with minor cuts and bruises. sadly, the sharks did not survive. >> who thought that was a good idea? >>> the economy could suffer a major blow next week if thousands of union dock workers make good on their threat to strike. a walkout would close every port from boston to houston. that means tons of goods would not be able to move in or out. the contract expired back in september. >>> and it is that time of year again when warnings go out to everyone about the dangers of thin ice. case in point, take a look at this from monroe county, michigan. jim swayze was walking his dogs when one of them went out on the ice and fell in. oh, poor guy. his wife called in her cousin, he came out, jumped in the water to help their dog. rescue crews were able to get man and best friend to safety. good
to make this point, 12 hours before this killing, this massacre took place was a man in china who went into an elementary school. maybe people saw it fleetingly on television. and he had a knife. he didn't have a gun. and he knifed 23 people. 22 of them children, at least at this point, at the time of broadcast, all survived. it was a knife. it wasn't a gun. >> right, right. >> gun control is the answer right now. >> right. >> you know, in the wake of columbine, schools did kind of take a look at what happened and made a series of recommendations that now are in place in most part of the country, that when a teacher learns of a plot, they immediately have to report it to somebody. they encourage children to do that. so there are a set of policies in place that perhaps have prevented these kinds of f factions from taking place. the problem you have among others, this is not a high school student. gerald lockner, not a high school student, once somebody leaves high school and goes to college or goes on with their life or they're depressed and potentially suicidal, there's less of a commu
to handle manufactured goods from china. it's also the largest port on the east coast. now, last year this port handled $208 billion in cargo. we're talking about products like furniture and also apparel. in 2002, we saw a west coast port lockout. estimates suggest that that cost the economy $1 billion a day. and as with the fiscal cliff, there's a political angle with the container cliff as well. business groups are asking president obama to use his emergency powers under taft hartley to prevent a strike. president bush did that back about ten years ago. while a strike will cause major disruptions, there are alternatives for transporting goods, rail and also air are options, but of course those options are not cheap. >> back in november, our members started putting contingency plans into place. the options were either divert containers to west coast ports, bring merchandise in earlier, use canada or mexico, or use air freight. but all of those come at a significant cost as well. >> now, the deadline is 12:01 tomorrow night. and i think it's safe to say that retailers are hoping we co
know that we compete in the global economy. when we look at the tax policies of japan, china, brazil, other people we're competing for in a global economy we need to keep those rates low. keeping the rates low encourages businesses to commit long-term capital signatures, grow jobs, and grow personal income. >> i know you're a, you know, i know you're a giver, give, give, give. all you're worried about are your investors. what about southern company? why are you so on the dividends -- how does it affect southern company what happens with dividends and capital gains? >> well, it impacts southern as it impacts every other company in our industry. you know, when you think about the electric utility industry, we are a low beta kind of industry. we are low risk and typically we have a relatively attractive dividend yield. the general formation of return to investors is about 50% dividend yield and about 50% growth and earnings per share. so it's critically important for our industry which interestingly is one of the great contributors to employment growth and variety of other things. we sp
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)